Cloud Link Roundup #8 – The Secret of the Cloud, LAN, Fresh IT, and More

May 6 2011 | By | in Unified Monitoring

Every Friday we like to highlight some of our favorite posts on Cloud Computing, service orientated infrastructure, DevOps, and anything else that grabbed our attention over the week. Here are six great articles from the week of May 2nd that are worth taking a look at. Enjoy!

Sometimes we spend so much time involved in the inner-workings of something (“inside the sausage factory”) that it’s valuable to occasionally come up for air to get a fresh perspective on things. I had one of those moments this week during a conversation with a Sr. Engineer at one of our customers. After a long whiteboard session about networking within their Data Center, he asked me if it was useful (YES!) and then he said he wasn’t sure how that had anything to do with Cloud Computing.

Cloud computing demands a mix of technology skills, negotiating skills, and people skills and business acumen. By simplifying the cloud computing concept into layers, it is easier to define the roles and skills needed within the overall structure to see where your business fits into the model.

The thing is, science shows us that in complex adaptive systems tiny changes to the system can result in extreme behaviors. Events like this will happen again. I don’t panic when there is a cloud outage–I embrace it, because the other aspect of complex adaptive systems is that they adapt; they get better and better at handling various conditions over time.

Fewer people will be needed to carry out the work of implementing programs, while more people would do the architecture work needed to tie together different cloud services, and to hook these services back to in-house systems, said Bob Kelly, a Microsoft vice president for server and cloud platform marketing, during his presentation at the conference.

One of the traditional LAN design guidelines was that each server was dedicated to a single application and had a single IP address and a single MAC address. This assumption made total sense in a world of physical servers and it makes no sense in a world of virtualized servers.

I don’t think we’ll see enterprises brag about their successes in the cloud anytime soon, and perhaps for good reasons. You’ll have to rely on other sources for best practices and patterns of success. But trust me. It’s happening.

Josh Duncan is a former IT manager turned product marketer. In addition to writing on the topic of cloud operations for Zenoss he also writes on the topic of product marketing and can be found on Twitter at @Joshua_d.