Cloud Link Roundup #77 – OpenStack Fights Cloud Lock-In, Big Google Cloud SQL Databases

November 9 2012 | By | in Cloud

Every Friday, Zenoss highlights some of the best posts from the week. Here are some great articles they selected from 11/05/2012 that are worth taking a look at.

Using a hybrid cloud to safeguard your virtualization by Mia Vals | The Next Web

Disaster Recovery is an expensive task to think about, and it might be at the back of the mind if you work for a small or medium business. It’s almost an insurmountable mountain for many, with the costs of having an off-site replica being more expensive than many think.

Cisco Validated Designs for Cloud – Part 3 – Flexpod by Didier Rombaut | Cisco Blog

Over the past two weeks, Tom Nallen introduced the concept and benefits of the Cisco Validated Design , then Laszlo Bojtos,  illustrated this concept with the Cloud Service Assurance for Virtualized Multi-Services Data Center 2.2 Cisco Validated Design, with a specific emphasis on the integration with Cisco Intelligent Automation for Cloud.

First Apache-blessed CloudStack code debuts by Barb Darrow | Gigaom

The first version of the CloudStack open-source cloud platform carrying the Apache Foundation imprimatur is now available for download. The new “Incubating release” 4.0.0 integrates CloudBridge Amazon API support and support for Ceph and Caringo storage options.

OpenStack Fights Cloud Lock-In Worries by Charles Babcock | InformationWeek Cloud

Jonathan Bryce may have started out as implementer of the original Mosso Cloud in San Antonio that became the Rackspace Cloud. But the new executive director of the OpenStack Foundation said the OpenStack open source project is the best way to avoid getting locked into a cloud vendor’s operations.

It’s hosting, dammit: Fed up with fake cloud providers by David Linthicum | Cloud Computing – InfoWorld

According to a CIO survey by hosting provider ElasticHosts, “83 percent of companies are frustrated with having to cut through marketing hype to find out which solutions are genuine cloud offerings and which are merely conventional hosting services with the word ‘cloud’ added to the title.” Good ol’ cloud-washing in action!

Red Hat eyes China’s cloud market for growth  by Jamie Yap | ZDNet

Open-source software company Red Hat will increase its focus on the Chinese market and has plans to invest more into its research and development (R&D) and sales teams in the country. In a China Daily report Monday, Red Hat President and CEO Jim Whitehurst said the growing emphasis on China comes as IT spend and cloud computing technology are booming in the country.

Five Private Cloud Pitfalls to Avoid by Jeff Vance | Datamation

As organizations move more of their IT infrastructure and applications into private clouds, they are entering into uncharted territory. The roadmap isn’t always clear, and it’s easy to make mistakes – mistakes that in hindsight look obvious, but which can be hard to predict if you lack experience with cloud infrastructures.

Ignoring the cloud will leave you lost in the fog by Matthew Staff | Business Review Europe

When cloud computing first emerged as the ‘next big thing’ five years ago, it was written off by some as a passing craze without any real substance. Today, industry analyst Gartner lists it as one of the four main forces transforming the IT landscape.

Cloud Adoption Sparks Services Spending Shift  by Dave Courbanou | Channelnomics

With 2013 looming, there’s continued buzz about the state of the cloud, especially since 2012 proved so instrumental in the evolution of cloud and mobility services. But this dynamic landscape is far from settling down. In fact, according to Gartner, public cloud services in the upcoming year will “simultaneously [be] cannibalizing and stimulating demand for external IT services spending.”

Google allows bigger, faster Cloud SQL databases by David Meyer | ZDNet

The company has updated its Cloud SQL service, increasing the maximum size of databases tenfold and the maximum size of instances fourfold. Users can also now choose whether they want their database stored in a US or EU datacentre.

A few more noteworthy posts…